Farmland

On the farm.

Farmland is an area of land that has been principally or wholly used in the last 10 years for agricultural production. In simple terms you can think about it as a place which grows crops and livestock, rather than places like parks where mainly play goes on.

The UK does not have any specific definitions for farm types, but broadly speaking farms are split into livestock or mixed farming (livestock and crops). The term ‘arable’ refers to an area of land that has not previously been farmed – this might either be because there hasn’t been anything grown on the soil before, or because it was used for a different type of agricultural use prior to being farmed. Within the arable category lie horticultural farms (where fruit and vegetables are grown), orchards, and vineyards.

Points to note – Farmland cannot be sold subject to a restrictive covenant   restricting the use of the land.

Farmland in London is particularly at risk from development. The Mayor of London has proposed that new legislation be introduced to protect farm land in London which would include giving Agricultural Land a ‘presumption in law’ against being built on.

Farmland cannot be sold subject to a restrictive covenant   restricting the use of the land. Restrictive covenants are used to protect town and village greens from development; such covenants can only be exercised if they relate to open space or amenity land, not agricultural land.